Colorectal Surgeon and General Surgeon, Dr Stephen Allison






Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

Bowel Resection for Rectal Cancer

What is Rectal Cancer?

Rectal Cancer is cancer of the lowest part of the large bowel immediately above the anus.

Rectal cancer is best treated in a multimodal manner with many disciplines of medicine involved including the surgeon, chemotherapy doctor and radiation doctor. Some patients require radiation and chemotherapy prior to the surgery, others require surgery alone and others require chemotherapy after the surgery. There are various investigations that help Dr Allison best plan your treatment.

Preoperative investigations may include colonoscopy, CT scan, MRI scan and endorectal ultrasound. These will help Dr Allison tailor your treatment to your needs.

Surgery to remove the rectum is called a Low Anterior Resection.

Lower Anterior Resection Explained

Low anterior resection can be performed by an open or laparoscopic (key-hole) approach. The decision about which is best for you will be decided by Dr Allison to optimise your cure from cancer.

Laparoscopic operation (key hole surgery)

Four ports (tubes) are placed into the abdomen through small cuts on the skin. Through these ports a telescope and operating instruments are placed.

The rectum is mobilised and the segment with the cancer is removed along with lymph nodes through one of the port sites. The bowel is joined together, and the anastomosis (join) is tested to ensure it is intact.

There are many structures that are identified and preserved including the ureters which are long tubes that carry the urine from the kidney to the bladder and hypogastric nerves that are required for ejaculation and erection in males.

Sometimes a loop ileostomy is required. This is a temporary stoma which diverts the faeces from the anastomosis site while the anastomosis heals. This stoma is removed at a second operation after the anastomosis has healed. This is more commonly required for very low anastomoses.

Open operation

A large midline wound between the umbilicus (belly button) and the pubic bone is created. The segment of the rectum with the cancer and the lymph nodes are removed as above.

For a consultation, diagnosis and further advice on rectal cancer, please contact us on (07) 3397 2634 for an appointment with Dr Allison.

Please let us know that you require a consultation for cancer and you will be seen the same week.

 

 

 

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Bowel (Colon) Resection for Large Bowel Cancer
or Polyp

What is Bowel Cancer?

This is cancer of the large bowel.

Preoperative investigations may include colonoscopy, CT scan and MRI scan. These will help Dr Allison tailor your treatment to your needs.

Surgery to remove the large bowel is called a colectomy.

Colectomy Explained

Colectomy can be performed by an open or laparoscopic (key-hole) approach. The decision about which is best for you will be decided by Dr Allison to optimise your cure from cancer.

Laparoscopic operation (key hole surgery)

Four ports (tubes) are placed into the abdomen through small cuts on the skin. Through these ports a telescope and operating instruments are placed.

The colon is mobilised and the segment with the cancer is removed along with lymph nodes through one of the port sites. The bowel is joined together, and the anastomosis (join) is tested to ensure it is intact.

There are many structures that are identified and preserved including the ureters which are long tubes that carry the urine from the kidney to the bladder and hypogastric nerves that are required for ejaculation and erection in males.

Open operation

A large midline wound is created. The segment of the colon with the cancer and the lymph nodes are removed as above.

For a consultation, diagnosis and further advice on bowel cancer, please contact us on (07) 3397 2634 for an appointment with Dr Allison.

Please let us know that you require a consultation for cancer and you will be seen the same week.